Upper Gi Bleeding

Bleeding in the Digestive Tract

Bleeding in the digestive tract is a symptom of a disease rather than a disease itself. A number of different conditions can cause bleeding. Most causes of bleeding are related to conditions that can be cured or controlled, such as ulcers or hemorrhoids. Some causes of bleeding may be life threatening. Locating the source of…

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Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative Colitis

What is ulcerative colitis? Ulcerative colitis is a disease that causes inflammation and sores, called ulcers, in the lining of the rectum and colon. Ulcers form where inflammation has killed the cells that usually line the colon, then bleed and produce pus. Inflammation in the colon also causes the colon to empty frequently, causing diarrhea.…

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Lactose intolerant

Lactose Intolerance

What is lactose intolerance? Lactose intolerance is the inability or insufficient ability to digest lactose, a sugar found in milk and milk products. Lactose intolerance is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme lactase, which is produced by the cells lining the small intestine. Lactase breaks down lactose into two simpler forms of sugar called…

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Steatohepatitis

Chronic Hepatitis C

What is Hepatitis C? The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the most important causes of chronic liver disease in the United States. It accounts for about 15 percent of acute viral hepatitis, 60 to 70 percent of chronic hepatitis, and up to 50 percent of cirrhosis, end-stage liver disease, and liver cancer. Of…

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Hepatitis A

What is hepatitis A? Hepatitis A is a liver disease. Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. Inflammation is the painful, red swelling that results when tissues of the body become injured or infected. Inflammation can cause organs to not work properly. What is the liver? The liver is an organ that does many important things.…

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Peptic ulcer

H. pylori and Peptic Ulcer

What is a peptic ulcer? A peptic ulcer is a sore on the lining of the stomach or duodenum, which is the beginning of the small intestine. Peptic ulcers are common: One in 10 Americans develops an ulcer at some time in his or her life. One cause of peptic ulcer is bacterial infection, but…

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Gas and Bloating

Why do I have gas? Everyone has gas. Burping and “passing gas” is normal. But because it is embarrassing, many people believe they pass gas too often or have too much gas. A person actually having too much gas is rare. Most of the time, gas in the body is odorless. The odor of passed…

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Liver Cirrhosis

Cirrhosis

What is cirrhosis? Cirrhosis is a condition in which the liver slowly deteriorates and malfunctions due to chronic injury. Scar tissue replaces healthy liver tissue, partially blocking the flow of blood through the liver. Scarring also impairs the liver’s ability to: control infections remove bacteria and toxins from the blood process nutrients, hormones, and drugs…

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Barretts Esophagus

Barrett’s Esophagus

What is Barrett’s esophagus?  Barrett’s esophagus is a condition in which the tissue lining the esophagus — the muscular tube that connects the mouth to the stomach — is replaced by tissue that is similar to the lining of the intestine. This process is called intestinal metaplasia.  No signs or symptoms are associated with Barrett’s…

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Crohns disease

Crohn’s Disease

What is Crohn’s disease? Crohn’s disease is an ongoing disorder that causes inflammation of the digestive tract, also referred to as the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Crohn’s disease can affect any area of the GI tract, from the mouth to the anus, but it most commonly affects the lower part of the small intestine, called the…

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